Events

The Boston Section has an active calendar that includes various educational courses as well as multiple opportunities to network and socialize with industry peers.

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Sep
10
Thu
Guidelines for Specifying Light Fixtures in WELL Projects; What to Consider and What to Avoid @ Virtual - Platform and login details provided after registration
Sep 10 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Please join the  IES Boston and Rhode Island Section for a presentation by Shahrzad Abtahi and Caitlin Toczko on specifying light fixtures for WELL projects. As members of the lighting community, we keep hearing about  the WELL standard. There has been an explosion of interest in the idea of buildings as health intervention tools. This new standard focusing on human health crossed the 205 million square feet threshold for registered and certified projects in 39 countries around the world and it is becoming a popular trend in the building industry.

Spaulding Rehab Center: Boston MA, Architect: Perkins + Will

One chapter of the WELL standard is dedicated to lighting. It provides guidelines for minimizing disturbance to human body’s circadian system, increasing productivity and providing appropriate visual acuity. The new version of WELL (i.e., V2) provides more flexibility and options for lighting designer to illuminate a “WELL lit” space.

WELL defines new standards for visual comfort and it adapts new metrics for circadian rhythm lighting. Achieving these goals would only be possible by specifying pertinent products for each application. Although these guidelines are fairly straightforward, and it’s been about 1 year since the release of V2, it seems that gathering all required data is not easily feasible for lighting designers. Despite the high demand, many lighting manufactures don’t provide all the required information that lighting designers need for specifying right fixtures for WELL projects.

This seminar gives an overview of the lighting requirements in WELL standard and  will focus on key factors that lighting designers need to consider before specifying lighting fixtures. It provides practical recommendations and strategies for both lighting designers and manufacturers who are interested in WELL or are working on a project pursuing WELL certification.

Shahrzad Abtahi is the director of lighting design at Lightcraft and she is the head of Lighting Group at Boston’s office. She was one of the first lighting designers to earn WELL accreditation and teaches lighting and design courses at Suffolk University and Boston Architectural College. She is a frequent speaker at multiple lighting and architectural conferences throughout the country. In march 2018, Shahrzad was named as one of North America’s top 40 under 40 lighting designers under 40 by lighting magazine.

Caitlin Toczko is a senior lighting designer and project manager with Lightcraft. Her work includes ambitious WELL and LEED projects for Yale, UConn, Fairfield University, Mathworks, WorkBar and Delos. Caitlin holds an M.S. in Architectural Sciences with a Concentration in Lighting from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is an associate member of the International Association of Lighting Designers and a professional member of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America.

Dec
3
Thu
ABX 2020 – TH14: Demystifying Lighting from Specification to Installation @ Virtual - Platform and login details provided after registration
Dec 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

When it comes to the lighting design process, even seasoned professionals may not always be aware of all those involved outside of their own industry. From architects and engineers to manufacturers, distributors, product reps, and contractors—lighting design involves the expertise of numerous professionals across all fields. Ensuring successful lighting design means ensuring that all players involved are aware of what others are contributing at what stage of the process. “Demystifying” the roles, value, and expectations of all involved opens the door for more effective communication and specifications—critical to the delivery of a successful project that is consistent with the original design intentions. This workshop aims to equip both emerging and seasoned professionals with a better understanding of the process, greater confidence in their interactions with others involved, and a clear path to improving the specifications they provide.

Feb
3
Wed
Empathetic Lighting: An Industry Snapshot of Material Transparency & Practices @ Virtual event - information provided after registration.
Feb 3 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Empathetic Lighting: An Industry Snapshot of Material Transparency & Practices

Please join the IES Boston and Rhode Island section for a panel discussion on material transparency and industry sustainability practices. The architectural industry has made large strides in the last 5-10 years in its sustainable product offerings, building practices, cleaner materials, and regenerative ideals. But where does this leave the lighting industry? While some may bring up the substantial reductions in energy usage with LED technology, we must pause and ask ourselves if better efficiency and lower wattage are enough. Stacked up next to the architectural offerings, we have a long road ahead of us to get up to speed with the rest of the movement regarding luminaire material transparency and climate impact. While we may be able to boast high efficacy, have we considered how our luminaries are made, what materials are being used, how they are harvested, and where the products go at the end of their useful life? Are we asking for PVC free wire casings and Environmental Product Declarations? Where do we stand in our education, progress, and practice?

This session will begin with a summary of a sustainability survey by a group of lighting designers which gauged lighting manufacturers’ present and future practices regarding material transparency, climate impact, and social health and equity. Some of the lesser-known components of the survey, such as the Red List, EPD’s, and Declare & Just labels, will be further examined. A panel discussion of industry experts will subsequently discuss next steps in self-organization facilitating the establishment of recommended guidelines around production and specification of luminaires that are both high performing and sustainably manufactured. Additional discussion topics will include how to hold sustainable business practices at different scales of business, as well as the choice to publicly share measured sustainable manufacturing practices, such as through Declare labels. The session will conclude with questions and participation from audience members.

 

Panelists

Melissa Mattes

Reiko Kagawa

Karen Jess-Lindsley

Ren DeCherney

Scott Sorensen

Alexandra Gadawski